Why don’t you just

I’m solution oriented. If I hear about a problem, I like to make suggestions about how it can be resolved. Sometimes before people have even stopped speaking, my brain is spinning on ideas.

As a coach and mentor, this trait can be a problem. Thinking about solutions interferes with my active listening. I can’t hear someone properly when I’m planning what I’ll say next. I can neglect to gather all the context to a situation before jumping in with my ideas. And when I offer my thoughts before acknowledging those of the person who I’m talking to, I lack empathy.

Earlier in my career I was taught the GROW model, which is a tool that has been used to aid coaching conversations since the 1980s. GROW is an acronym that stands for goal, reality, options, way forward. It gives a suggested structure to a conversation about goal setting or problem solving.

When I jump to solutions, I skip straight to the end of the GROW model. I’m focusing on the way forward. While I do want my coaching conversations to end in action, I can end up driving there too fast.

Pace of conversation is a difficult thing to judge. I’ve started to use a heuristic to help me work out when I’m leaping ahead. If I can prefix a response with “Why don’t you just” then it’s likely that I’ve jumped into solution mode alone, without the person that I’m speaking to.

Why don’t you just ask Joan to restart the server?

Why don’t you just look through the test results and see how many things failed?

Why don’t you just buy some new pens?

Why don’t you just” is the start of a question, which indicates I’m not sure that what I’m about to say is a valid way forward. If I’m uncertain, it’s because I don’t have enough information. Instead of suggesting, I loop back and ask the questions that resolve my uncertainty.

“Why don’t you just” indicates an easy option. It’s entirely likely that the person has already identified the simplest solutions themselves. Instead of offering an answer that they know, I need to ask about the options they’ve already recognised and dismissed. There are often many.

“Why don’t you just” can also help me identify when I’m frustrated because the conversation is stuck. Perhaps the other person is enjoying a rant about their reality or cycling through options without choosing their own way forward. Then I need to ask a question to push the conversation along, or abandon it if they’re simply talking as a cathartic outlet.

This prompt helps me determine the pace of a conversation. I can recognise when I need to slow down and gather more information, or when a conversation has stalled and I need to push the other person along. Perhaps “Why don’t you just” will help others who are afflicted with a need for action.


Source: ministry of testing
Why don’t you just

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